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Piazza Brà
Piazza Brà

Piazza Brà

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Free admission
Piazza Brà , Verona, Italy

The Basics

Any visitor to Verona can expect to cross Piazza Bra at least once during their stay. On the west side of the square is Portoni della Bra—a grand arched entryway—and the impressive Gran Guardia Palace. On the south side is the Barbieri Palace, now the city’s town hall. The square is a frequent stop on guided walking or bike tours of the city.

On the north side is theliston, a parade of cafes and restaurants named after the paving stones that line the area that’s ideal for people watching over a cappuccino. On the east side is perhaps the most famous of all Verona’s attractions, the Verona Arena, a Roman amphitheater that seats 15,000 people. In summer, grand-scale operas are held here—it’s an annual event that is famous worldwide.

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Things to Know Before You Go

  • If you’re planning to attend a performance at the Verona Arena, book in advance.

  • A small shaded garden in the square surrounds a fountain and a bronze statue of Victor Emmanuel II, the first king of Italy.

  • Visitors can find out more about the buildings in the square on a guided walking tour.

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How to Get There

Piazza Bra is located in the center of Verona. It’s accessible on foot, by bus, taxi, or as part of a bike or Segway tour of the city center.

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When to Get There

A public square, Piazza Bra is open 24 hours a day all year round. Cafes and restaurants are busy at the usual hours, especially in summer. For the best people watching, head to the square early evening to take part in the daily passeggiata, a tradition when Italian families and groups of friends take a stroll before dinner.

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Explore Verona Arena

Dominating the eastern side of Piazza Bra is the Verona Arena, a Roman amphitheater built during the first century AD to hold up to 30,000 people. Visitors can peek inside on a guided tour, or, better yet, by attending one of the summertime opera performances.

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