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Things to Do in Seattle - page 2

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T-Mobile Park
4 Tours and Activities

Safeco Field is the home of the Mariners baseball team, and the stadium is located just south of the city center in Seattle. The Seattle Mariners’ original home, the Kingdome, was replaced in the 1990s by Safeco Field, which hosted its first Major League Baseball game in 1999. The stadium holds more than 47,000 spectators for baseball games, and features a retractable roof.

Among the attractions at Safeco Field - besides the baseball games themselves - are the Mariners Hall of Fame, the Baseball Museum of the Pacific Northwest, and the many baseball-related pieces of artwork on display throughout the stadium.

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Elliott Bay
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2 Tours and Activities

Many know Seattle to be located upon the Puget Sound, but the specific body of water upon which Seattle sits is none other than the great Elliot Bay. And because Elliot Bay is the most prevalent source of water when visiting Seattle, it is part-and-parcel to the inner fabric of the “city by the sound.” From the original Duwamish peoples that lived here, to the locals that come enjoy the Elliot Bay Park along the waterfront, Elliot Bay is part of the culture, and it’s here that many visitors come to explore Seattle.

With two marinas, numerous piers (including Pier 57 and Pier 59, both popular attractions), the Seattle Great Wheel, and the Seattle Aquarium, Elliot Bay provides many things to many people. Not the least of which is the great port of Seattle – one of America’s biggest and most important ports. Ferries also take commuters and tourists across the Bay to Bainbridge or Vashon Island.

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Alki Beach
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2 Tours and Activities

This picturesque beach on the shore of Elliott Bay runs a narrow 2.5-mile strip between Alki Point and Duwamish Head. Known as the site of the first white settlers in Seattle, its sandy shores attract as many cyclists, joggers and bladers as beachcombers and sun worshipers and storm chasers. Public restrooms, picnic areas, an art studio and bathhouses make it the perfect destination for a day of outdoor fun with family and friends. And impressive views of the Puget Sound and Seattle skyline make it one of the most scenic strips of sand in Washington.

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Myrtle Edwards Park
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Not far from the bustle of Seattle’s Space Needle, there is a public park on the bay where the focus is on wildlife and nature. The 4.8-acre Myrtle Edwards Park stretches along Elliott Bay and is known for its 1.25-mile paved walking and cycling path, and for the many opportunities to see eagles, herons and other wildlife.

The park was originally called Elliott Bay Park, but was renamed in 1976 for Myrtle Edwards. Edwards had been a prominent member of Seattle’s city council, where she fought for the preservation of the city’s natural spaces. Located between the park and the Space Needle is the Olympic Sculpture Park, a nine-acre park of outdoor art installations that opened in 2007.

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Olympic Sculpture Park
8 Tours and Activities

One of the many expanses of open greenery in Seattle, the Olympic Sculpture Park is a wide swath of open space aimed at providing the people of Seattle an easily-accessible park in which to view some of the greatest modern sculptures of our time. Arguably much more of a park than a museum, Olympic Sculpture Park plays host to numerous social activities, dances, and public performances throughout the year. People come here to walk or jog the hiking path, view the waterfront, have a picnic on a nice sunny day, or just wander around and explore the modern art.

Situated on the Seattle waterfront, the Olympic Sculpture Park is one of Seattle’s most picturesque and widely beloved parks.

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Gas Works Park
9 Tours and Activities
Locals flock to Seattle’s Gas Works Park for its grassy hills and steampunk-esque former gas plant structures. Set at the northern end of Lake Union, visitors come to fly kites, picnic, watch sailboat races, and take in skyline views. This National Historic Landmark appeared in the 1999 movie 10 Things I Hate About You.
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Capitol Hill
6 Tours and Activities

Back when Capitol Hill was named, its creators anticipated the neighborhood to become the capitol of Washington State and stately mansions and elaborate Victorian style residences still attest to that early vision. History took a different route though and the demographics changed profoundly soon after World War II. Capitol Hill turned from a ritzy area into the funky, hip neighborhood of today and is now home to a diverse mix of cultures and countercultures. Young professionals mingle with the thriving LGTBQ community, artists and foodies frequent establishments were Kurt Cobain once played and there is a huge variety of niche theaters, music venues, quirky coffee shops, bookstores and boutiques lining the streets.

One of the highlights is the weekly Broadway Farmers Market, which provides the population of Capitol Hill with fresh and seasonal artisanal foods, flowers and good music each Sunday.

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Ballard District
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Head to “Snoose Junction” (a.k.a. the Ballard District) to experience a thriving and hip waterfront neighborhood that houses some of Seattle’s best restaurants, pubs, shops, spas and parks. Since 1853, this historic Scandinavian neighborhood has been cultivating its fashionable image, and now you can walk the busy tree-lined streets and see how all the hard work has paid off. Watch the Ballard locks open and allow ships through, see the Nordic Heritage Museum, shop the ever-popular Market Street, or enjoy the eclectic restaurants and pubs on Ballard Ave. Look out for unique curio shops and if you can, catch the Ballard Farmer’s Market - Sundays on Ballard Ave. 10 a.m. – 3 p.m. It’s a Seattle staple.

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Seattle Art Museum (SAM)
3 Tours and Activities
Located in downtown Seattle, the Seattle Art Museum has a wide-ranging collection, from Native American masterpieces to cutting-edge installations. This Seattle institution, known affectionately as SAM, is a playground for art lovers; temporary exhibitions with creative flair ensure every visit is as fresh as the first.
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Museum of Flight

Seattle has a long history with aviation and it was here that the first ever Boeing aircraft was assembled and where the company used to have its headquarters for decades. It makes sense that the city also hosts one of the most interesting aviation museums in North America. The Museum of Flight shows the history of flight starting with the experiments of the Wright Brothers and progresses through the years with over 150 planes, helicopters and even some satellites, rockets, space station parts and lunar module mockups.

Located at the Museum of Flight are also some more well-known aircrafts that are worthy of a special mention. The first presidential jet ever, now better known under its call sign Air Force One, has transported presidents Eisenhower, Kennedy, Johnson and Nixon and can be visited at the Airpark.

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More Things to Do in Seattle

Washington State Ferries

Washington State Ferries

2 Tours and Activities
The quintessential mode of travel for exploring the islands of Puget Sound, Washington State Ferries offer transportation, sightseeing, and wildlife viewing. Hop on a ferry in Seattle and arrive at one of the many picturesque islands across the bay within an hour—all while avoiding traffic and enjoying Seattle skyline views.
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Hard Rock Cafe Seattle

Hard Rock Cafe Seattle

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Seattle's Hard Rock Cafe is located in the heart of historic downtown, near the famous Pike Place Market. The building in which the restaurant is housed is historic, too, as well as environmentally designed, and the memorabilia on display is largely Seattle-specific. The Hard Rock Cafe in Seattle, like all restaurants in the chain, features a traditional American menu, and an on-site Rock Shop where you can buy all kinds of Hard Rock Cafe merchandise. The Seattle location also features a music venue on the second floor, called the Cavern Club after the Liverpool basement club where The Beatles got their start.

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Belltown

Belltown

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Belltown is the former low-rent and industrial turned hip, young and trendy neighborhood in Seattle and it is here that most of the city’s residential base lives – in high-rise residences of course. Due to the district’s popularity, many chic boutiques, hot nightclubs and upscale restaurants have moved into the business spaces on the street level of those skyscrapers, but there are also plenty of quirky places to eat, interesting art galleries, clothing stores and much more to be found. In fact, Belltown is considered to be one of the most walkable neighborhoods in the United States and everything you could ever need or ask for can be found within its boundaries. Thus, leave your car at home and go exploring on foot.

Head to the Olympic Sculpture Park to get a look at the many art installations put together by local artists or get tickets for a concert at The Crocodile, one of Seattle’s favorite concert venues, for some incredible live music.

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Sky View Observatory

Sky View Observatory

1 Tour and Activity
Seattle is home to the highest public observatory on the West Coast. At nearly 1,000 feet, the Sky View Observatory is actually the tallest public viewing area west of the Mississippi.
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Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation Discovery Center

Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation Discovery Center

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Sleek and modern, the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation Discovery Center is a free museum focused on global philanthropy, including the many projects and partnerships of the multi-billion dollar foundation. Across 5th Ave from the Space Needle and spread throughout the first floor of the organization’s operational headquarters, visitors can wander past glass partitions etched with inspirational slogans and informative photographic displays that educate and inform on topics like global poverty, universal access to fresh water, combating pervasive infectious diseases and other seemingly intractable problems. Even signs above the water fountains here, which read, ‘What if you had to walk three miles for this water?’ are thought-provoking.
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Tillicum Village

Tillicum Village

Located in Blake Island State Park, across Puget Sound from Seattle, Tillicum Village is a truly Pacific Northwest Experience. This beautiful spot is essentially a large restaurant and performance hall, which is designed as a traditional Northwest Coast longhouse, complete with totem poles towering out front. A visit here includes a salmon dinner, tribal performances, and more. Upon visiting the Tillicum Village, which is only accessible by boat, you’ll be greeted by villagers dressed in Northwest Coastal Native tribal costume. Outside the longhouse facility, visitors are given a cup of clams and broth. As you enter the longhouse, a cooking display shows whole salmon being cooked on cedar stakes over an alder wood fire in a traditional style of Northwest Coastal Natives. A buffet-style meal includes baked salmon, new red potatoes, warm whole grain bread, wild and long grain rice, and a fresh salad bar.
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Blake Island Marine State Park

Blake Island Marine State Park

Almost completely wild, Blake Island State Park is made up of thickly wooded trails, a fascinating underwater park as well as the typical flora and fauna of the Pacific Northwest. According to one of many legends, Chief Seattle of the Suquamish Indian tribe, after whom Seattle was named, was born on this island. Definitely true is that the island was used as a camping ground by the tribe and it was named after George Smith Blake, an officer of the United States Coast Survey. The Indian history can be explored in Tillicum Village, where traditional dances, dinners and cultural experiences are offered.

While heavily logged in the early 19th century, the Blake Island is now once again covered in thick cedar, fir, maple and spruce forests with cherry trees, foxglove and thistle adding some dots of color in the right season.

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Woodland Park

Woodland Park

A natural oasis in the middle of Seattle, Woodland Park encompasses manicured landscapes, walking paths, rose gardens, and a zoo. Home to diverse species of wildlife, Woodland Park Zoo is indisputably the park’s main attraction. Visitors can also enjoy outdoor recreation areas, picnic spots, and lakeside strolls.
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Mt. Rainier National Park

Mt. Rainier National Park

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17 Tours and Activities

The majestic Mount Rainier, the US 4th-highest peak outside Alaska, is also one of its most beguiling. Encased in the 953-sqkm Mount Rainier National Park, the mountain’s snow-capped summit and forest-covered foothills harbor numerous hiking trails, a wide range of sub-alpine flora and fauna, and an alluring conical peak that presents a formidable challenge for aspiring climbers.

In the higher elevations, snow covers much of the Mount Rainier year round. In lower elevations, you’ll find wildflower-draped slopes, lush rainforests of Douglas firs and western red cedars, and rivers.

The National Park is also home to all sorts of wildlife, including black bears, dear, elk, and mountain goats. Marmots, a large member of the squirrel family, are a common site in the park, often seen stretching out on rocks to bask in the sun as well frolicking in the meadows, seemingly oblivious to human presence. Summer is the best time to take in all that the park has to offer.

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Chateau Ste. Michelle Winery

Chateau Ste. Michelle Winery

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Many of us regularly sip wine at home with a good meal, but for those wanting to know the history behind the rich liquid inside the glass, the Chateau Ste. Michelle Vineyards opens its gates to visitors. The French style winery dispels the myth that good wine can only be produced in warm climates and proves that great wines can most definitely come from Washington state. It is located in the rain shadow of the Cascade Mountains in the Columbia Valley, where warmer temperatures and less wet weather allow the vines to flourish. With over 100 years of tradition to look back on, Chateau Ste. Michelle prides itself on combining old world winemaking with modern innovations and thus operates two modern wineries for both red and white wine.

There are regular guided tours and tastings held, which give insight into the bottling and fermentation process and refine the palette as well as show how to properly smell, swirl and taste wine.

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Snoqualmie Falls

Snoqualmie Falls

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One of Washington state’s most popular attractions, Snoqualmie Falls is a waterfall on the Snoqualmie River. More than one million visitors come every year to watch the spectacular rush of water tumble down 270 feet/82 meters into a pool of deep, blue water. The falls are also known internationally for its appearance in the Twin Peaks television series.

The top of Snoqualmie Falls is a short distance from the parking lot, which has a gift shop, espresso stand, and bathrooms. The main views are from the side of the falls, which also has picnic tables and benches, and a small grassy meadow called the Centennial Green, where weddings are performed through the summer. On the way down to the base of the falls, hikers trek through a temperate rain forest, with a few moss covered trees, giant ferns, and a few resting spots. At the bottom of the trail is the 1910 powerhouse and the river itself.

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Seattle Cruise Port

Seattle Cruise Port

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A city with many identities – from coffee to technology to nature to seafood – Seattle is a great place to start or end a cruise. Shore excursions that go outside the city can fill all kinds of desires; take a wine-tasting tour, explore Bainbridge Island or visit Olympic National Park.

If you’re in a more urban mood, get to know the city itself at top attractions like Pike Place Market and the Space Needle, as well as one of its many walkable neighborhoods like Lower Queen Anne.

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Olympic National Park

Olympic National Park

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Competing with neighboring Mt. Rainier National Park as the pinnacle of Northwestern outdoor activities, Olympic National Park boasts over 1,400 square miles (almost a million acres) of teaming tide-pools, alpine glacial lakes, and wildflower-filled lowland meadows.

Hiking, camping, kayaking, fly-fishing, and mountaineering are all popular pastimes here, and the simple pleasures of the moss-draped Olympic National Park are prevalent. More than three times the biomass of tropical rainforests, the Pacific Northwest is an overwhelmingly abundant environment for old growth trees, and visitors to this area will enjoy a network of trails that extend from foggy beaches to rocky ridge lines, cascading waterfalls, and everything in-between.

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Mt. St. Helens

Mt. St. Helens

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On the morning of May 18th, 1980, the largest terrestrial landslide in recorded history punched a 1300 foot hole in the side of Mount St. Helens and rained fire and ash at a speed of 300 mph down the mountainside. 30 years later, this amazing display of Mother Earth’s power is still visible at the Mount St. Helens National Volcanic Monument where numerous trails extend throughout the park and give visitors an up-close and personal view of lava plains, the damage from the blast, and the ensuing life birthed from this massive volcanic eruption. From the breathtaking approach drive to the informational visitor centers, your first experiences with this majestic park are likely to be memorable ones.

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