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Balliol College
Balliol College

Balliol College

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256 Reviews
Broad Street, Oxford, United Kingdom, OX1 3BJ

The Basics

There is a small charge to enter Balliol College, which gets you access to the Victorian-era chapel, the gardens, and sometimes the dining hall. As Balliol is architecturally less spectacular than colleges such as Christ Church and lacks the literary connections of, say, Merton, it’s not an especially common destination for organized Oxford walking or cycling tours, most of which stop at the frontage rather than exploring within. Most travelers visit independently, while exploring central Oxford on bicycle or foot.

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Things to Know Before You Go

  • Balliol College is especially of interest to travelers with a curiosity about British politics.

  • Avoid looking through windows, especially during term: Students and academics live and work here.

  • There is wheelchair access to much of the ground level at Balliol College, but you will need to advise the porters ahead of time.

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How to Get There

Balliol College is located in central Oxford, on the corner of Broad Street and St. Giles. Almost everyone explores Oxford on foot, or perhaps by bicycle, and it’s generally easiest to arrive by train or bus. Most London trains start from Paddington, while the popular Oxford Tube coach service stops at Victoria, Shepherd’s Bush, Notting Hill Gate, and Marble Arch. Drivers typically leave their vehicles in park-and-ride zones outside the city.

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Trip ideas

Exploring the Oxford University Colleges

Exploring the Oxford University Colleges


When to Get There

Balliol College is open to visitors from late morning until late afternoon, or dusk, whichever comes sooner, but closes occasionally for college events. Like other Oxford colleges, it can get very busy during the summer months, particularly on weekends. Plan to visit during shoulder seasons, and/or earlier in the day, for a better experience.

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Balliol College Alumni

Balliol College has an impressive roster of alumni, particularly in the turbulent field of British politics. Authors including Graham Greene and Aldous Huxley studied here, along with three British prime ministers, the controversial politician Boris Johnson, and intellectuals such as Richard Dawkins, John Evelyn, and John Wycliffe.

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