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Franz Mayer Museum (Museo Franz Mayer)
Franz Mayer Museum (Museo Franz Mayer)

Franz Mayer Museum (Museo Franz Mayer)

Av. Hidalgo 45, Cuauhtemoc, Ciudad de Mexico, D.F., Mexico, 06300

The Basics

Inaugurated in 1986, the Franz Mayer Museum offers one of the most diverse permanent collections of any Mexico City museum. From silver, tiles, and textiles, to furniture, sculpture, and paintings—including some 22,000 books—there’s something to delight most history and art buffs. Stop by the Franz Mayer Museum during a convenient hop-on hop-off bus tour or while exploring the historic center on foot where you can explore the exhibition halls independently or as part of a guided tour to learn more about the pieces.

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Things to Know Before You Go

  • Museo Franz Mayer is a must-visit for art and history lovers in Mexico City.

  • Guided tours at the Franz Mayer Museum are held twice a day on Saturdays and Sundays; they can also be arranged outside of these hours with prior notice.

  • Children under 12 enter for free.

  • Franz Mayer Museum is generally wheelchair and stroller accessible, with elevators or access ramps available in most areas.

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How to Get There

Franz Mayer Museum is situated in the historic center of Mexico City and is easily accessible on foot for most visitors. The closest metro stations are Hidalgo and Bellas Artes (both Blue Line), while most hop-on hop-off bus services also stop nearby. There’s a parking lot next door to the museum.

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When to Get There

The Franz Mayer Museum is typically open between 10am and 5pm, from Tuesday to Sunday. The museum always closes on Christmas Day (December 25) and New Year’s Day (January 1). Arrive early to see the museum at its quietest.

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Who Was Franz Mayer?

Born in Germany to a German-Jewish family in 1882, Franz Mayer relocated to Mexico at the turn of the 20th century. He eventually went on to help create the Mexican Stock Exchange, became a Mexican citizen, and amassed a fortune that helped further his passion for art collecting. In 1975, his vast art collection was bequeathed to the state and is now housed in the museum bearing his name.

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