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Museum of Discovery and Science
Museum of Discovery and Science

Museum of Discovery and Science

star-5
295 Reviews
401 Southwest 2nd Street, Fort Lauderdale, 33312

The Basics

Located on Las Olas Boulevard in downtown Fort Lauderdale, this two-story art and science museum is family-friendly. On the main floor, you’ll find the permanent exhibits, including the Discovery Center (for kids 6 and under); an Everglades Airboat Adventure, which simulates a ride through the Florida swamps; exhibits on Florida’s ecosystems; a glimpse at live otters at play; and a Storm Center with a hurricane simulator. Don’t miss getting your photo in the mouth of the Megalodon.

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Things to Know Before You Go

  • Outside food and beverages are not allowed in the museum. The IMAX theater concession sells snacks and drinks.

  • There is an on-site gift shop.

  • The museum offers free Wi-Fi.

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How to Get There

MODS is located in the Arts & Science District in downtown Fort Lauderdale on Second Street, across from Riverwalk’s Esplanade Park. From Miami or Palm Beach, take I-95 to the Broward Boulevard exit, then drive east to SW Fifth Avenue and turn right. The museum is on your left, with a parking garage on the right. The Brightline express train stops two blocks away from the museum.

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When to Get There

The museum is open 10am–5pm Monday through Saturday and noon–5pm on Sunday; it’s closed only closed for Thanksgiving, Christmas, and special events. If you can, catch an IMAX 3D show in the largest theater in Florida. In March, the museum hosts an annual Wine, Spirits, and Culinary Celebration, with a Grand Tasting featuring more than 40 South Florida restaurants.

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In the Mouth of a Megalodon

One of the best photo opportunities at MODS is in the mouth of the Megalodon, considered to be the largest sharks that ever lived on earth. Some of their teeth alone measured seven inches (17 centimeters) long, and their jaws are estimated to be about three times as big as the Great White Shark. Occasionally, visitors to South Florida find fossilized Megalodon teeth washed up on area beaches.

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